Roman Pottery from the Fortress

Item

list of authors
J. Monaghan
Is Part Of
The Archaeology of York [Series]
The Pottery [Volume]
volume
16
issue
07
Publisher
Council for British Archaeology for York Archaeological Trust
Date Copyrighted
1993
Date Available
Digitally available on 8 December 2023
Abstract
The Roman pottery from 9 Blake Street reveals the changing patterns of ceramic use within the legionary fortress of Eboracum from c. AD 71 through to the end of the 4th century. A Cerialian date for the foundation of the fortress is confirmed by a quantity of pre-Flavian and early Flavian fine wares, including a large dump of unused South Gaulish samian. The ceramic evidence is used to identify a gap in occupation during the years 120-60 and to date the rebuilding of this area of the fortress in stone to the Antonine period. There is a paucity of ceramics dating to the mid 3rd century, due to regular cleaning within the stone buildings. The 4th century evidence points to a deterioration in rubbish disposal practices within the fortress, coupled with a reduction in density of occupation. A discussion of the pottery found at the Purey Cust Nuffield Hospital and the Assembly Rooms reinforces the ceramic sequence at 9 Blake Street. Twenty thousand sherds are quantified and the statistics presented in tabular and graphic form. The results are used to identify differences in function between the various stone buildings and to compare the site with others in Britain. The supply of pottery to the fortress is investigated and individual wares are discussed in detail. A synthesis of the origins and development of the Eboracum ware industry in York is presented: it is shown to originate as a Flavian military pottery and to pass in part to civilian hands in the Hadrianic period, returning under military control by the late 2nd—early 3rd century. Specialist reports include descriptions of an assemblage of 24 lamps and an important group of Gallo-Belgic imports. The conclusions identify gaps in our knowledge of Roman ceramics in York, which should be subjects for future research.
Rights Holder
York Archaeological Trust
Rights
CC BY 4.0
Format
Portable Document Format (PDF)
Is Format Of
Paper publication
Identifier
GB2837-PUB-AY-16-7
oclcnum
29922682
isbn10
1872414451
isbn13
9781872414454
Type
Text
Language
English
page start
667
page end
824
number of pages
158

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