Biological Evidence from the Roman Warehouses in Coney Street

Item

list of authors
H. K. Kenward
D. Williams
list of contributors
J. R. A. Greig
J. S. R. Hood
Is Part Of
The Archaeology of York [Series]
The Past Environment of York [Volume]
volume
14
issue
02
Publisher
Council for British Archaeology for York Archaeological Trust
Date Copyrighted
1979
Date Available
Digitally available on 22 September 2023
Abstract
Biological and pedological evidence from layers underlying and associated with two phases of Roman riverside store-buildings has proved to be of great significance in the understanding of the site. The deposits underlying the earliest phase of occupation were shown to be a natural soil. A thin band of humic silt overlying the first phase of building contained immense numbers of grain beetles together with a few seeds of arable weeds, and clearly represented the remains of a large quantity of spoiled grain. A thick layer of silt had been dumped over this, probably to seal off the infestation as well as to serve as a foundation for the second store-building. Associated with the latter was a substantial quantity of charred grain of mixed composition. The possible origin and intended usage of the grain are discussed; importation from existing centres of insect infestation, perhaps in southern Britain, seems probable but there is insufficient evidence concerning the intended use of the grain or the reason for its charring.
Rights Holder
York Archaeological Trust
Rights
CC BY 4.0
Format
Portable Document Format (PDF)
Is Format Of
Paper publication
Identifier
GB2837-PUB-AY-14-2
oclcnum
5796422
isbn10
0900312874
isbn13
9780900312878
Type
Text
Language
English
page start
45
page end
100
number of pages
56

Position: 325 (11 views)