Union Terrace: Excavations in the Horsefair

Item

list of authors
J. D. Richards
C. Heighway
S. Donaghey
Is Part Of
The Archaeology of York [Series]
The Medieval Defences and Suburbs [Volume]
volume
11
issue
01
Publisher
Council for British Archaeology for York Archaeological Trust
Date Copyrighted
1989
Date Available
Digitally available on 8 September 2023
Abstract
Excavations at Union Terrace, York, in 1972 revealed continuous occupation from the late 12th to mid 17th centuries. Buildings were extended and modified throughout this period, their function changing from friary to hospital, and then to school. There are both archaeological and documentary sources, but there are inevitably difficulties in relating the two.

The first building was used as the 13th century church of the Carmelite Friary. This was a substantial limestone building, constructed on an east-west axis. It was extended westwards and a burial ground developed to the south. The building remained in use until1295 when the Carmelites moved to a site in the centre of York.

The east end of the church remained in use as a chapel, and the west end was partitioned into a number of rooms, divided by a screens passage. A subsidiary block, including latrines, was extended to the north. These buildings are interpreted as the remains of St Mary's Hospital in the Horsefair.

In the 15th century the character of the hospital was altered and it began to adopt a more quadrangular plan. The west end was demolished, and its site occupied by a large building on an entirely new alignment. This was possibly a hall, with narrow stone footings perhaps for a timber superstructure. Further rooms, including a cellar, were successively added and modified during the 15th and 16th centuries. A domestic block, including a kitchen and a well, was built to the north.

These buildings were altered again in the 16th century when the site was taken over for use by St Peter's School. The hall was extended to the north and south, and a number of rooms partitioned off. The domestic block was also altered with the addition of an oven.

The buildings were finally demolished in the mid 17th century, when they were damaged in the Civil War siege of York and St Peter's School left the site. After a period of abandonment, the site was re-occupied in the early 19th century for housing.
Rights Holder
York Archaeological Trust
Rights
CC BY 4.0
Format
Portable Document Format (PDF)
Is Format Of
Paper publication
Identifier
GB2837-PUB-AY-11-1
oclcnum
25103513
isbn10
0906780829
isbn13
9780906780824
Type
Text
Language
English
page start
1
page end
40
number of pages
40

Position: 272 (13 views)